Common Core State Standards and SLPs

One thing I have found in my adventures in education is that we all, teachers – administrators – SLPs – parents, have a love-hate relationship with the Common Core State Standards (CCSS).

paperwork

Frankly, it ranks right up there with caseload sizes, teacher certification, idiotic review processes, and annoyances with ASHA for the number of people that are disgruntled by it.

(For those who don’t know me, I have a great caseload size, I’m not teacher certified, and I’m not unhappy with ASHA…but I know lots of SLPs who are 1 if not all 4 of these).

Most SLPs would agree, CCSS appears to add a lot of nonsense work to our already busy schedules. It seems redundant to what we are already doing. A common thread of dissatisfaction comes from the fact that it pushes kids…and it does. For the exceptional kids who are already pushed, it feels almost insurmountable and as if we are doing a grave disservice to them.

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Advocacy in SLP, part I

Advocacy…Advocacy…who has the Advocacy…

Also known as 7 Habits of the Burnt-Out SLP

In preparation for a new series of posts on advocacy (SLPs and caseloads really), I have decided to repost the July 2012 post on Adventures in Advocacy.  There are two other Advocacy posts here and here. Please take a moment and check them out…They are relevant.

In the not too distant future (hopefully), I will be posting the results of a survey I conducted in April. To say the results were disturbing is an understatement. But…there’s always hope…right?   pulling hair

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Adventures in RTI (part two)

My apologies if this seems disjointed from my other RTI post; however, when I was considering what to write about today, I realized there are some great resources available and I wanted to share.

As most everyone (at least here in the states) is aware, RTI is huge. It’s also very hard to implement well. Many times it seems as though RTI is implemented and then nothing happens. The students receive some help, but no one is quite sure if the data being taken is correct, if the intervention is the right intervention for the problem, or what to do once progress is (or isn’t) seen.

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