10 Ways SLP’s Can Affect Change in the School Setting

A while ago a FB discussion began discussing caseloads (yes, again). One SLP mentioned how she had managed to advocate for both the students she serves AND the SLPs in her district, so of course I asked her to guest blog how she did it. We know caseloads and advocacy are major problems with many SLPs afraid they’ll lose their jobs if they speak up. superSLP-symbol

 

Here is one SLP’s suggestions for solving that problem! I hope we can all learn from her!

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Educating Students with ASD – a book review

Once again, Plural Publishing provided me with the opportunity to review one of their publications.

As we all know, the incidence of Autism is increasing. When I first started in special education, I believe, it was thought that 1: 250 or so students would be diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder. Then it dropped to 1:110. Now, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, it’s 1:68 (with a rate of 1:42 in boys, and 1:189 in girls). It’s fairly safe to say that if you don’t have someone on your caseload with autism yet, you most likely will within the next year. The new text from Plural deals with the idea of coaching individuals with autism. Continue reading

Finding the research!

“You are either part of the problem – or part of the solution…If you’re not an active part of the solution you are, by default, a part of the problem.” M.E.Huston. Yep. I’m quoting myself, how narcissistic is that? (Guess what, I didn’t really quote myself. Apparently I misquoted Eldridge Cleaver.)  However, in this case, it absolutely applies. Let me explain.

A few weeks ago, I published a post about pseudoscience and the unfortunate (but true) trend we seem to be experiencing within speech-language pathology of sliding down pseudoscience’s slippery slope.

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Have we turned into pseudoscientists?

This will not be a popular post.  I suspect it will anger a few, for that I’m sorry…A few will write to congratulate me…and a few will simply unfollow me. Regardless, I feel it has to be said. I hope that patience will be in abundance today.

It’s no secret that I love social media. I’ve been active with the #SLPeeps community on twitter since before the hashtag was created (that’s pre-2010 for those who don’t know). I’ve written about using social media to increase professional networking in the ASHA Leader Live several times. But, I’ll have to admit, I have a love-hate relationship with Facebook. I’ve been on several FB SLP groups (and left, and returned, and left, and returned). Today, I was resoundingly reminded of why and rather than leave the group, I’ve decided to vent here.  Continue reading

Just…Begin

Yes, it’s the New Year…and yes, it’s time for resolutions if you do them (I don’t).

For me, the New Year isn’t a time of resolutions, it’s a time of reflection. What did I accomplish? What did I not accomplish? Which direction am I heading?

It’s also the time to consider potential changes and act on them. Not in a resolution sort of way…but in a goal setting sort of way.  Continue reading

Something to think about

In our field, billing for insurance and medicaid is a necessary evil (it seems).

Recently, omedical-billing-claim-denials-resized-600n the ASHA community page someone commented about billing for medicaid. I’ve heard the discussion before, and it was definitely one of the things I’ve asked about in interviews…but there’s two very different sides. I’d love your opinion on each side.  Continue reading

Common Core State Standards and SLPs

One thing I have found in my adventures in education is that we all, teachers – administrators – SLPs – parents, have a love-hate relationship with the Common Core State Standards (CCSS).

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Frankly, it ranks right up there with caseload sizes, teacher certification, idiotic review processes, and annoyances with ASHA for the number of people that are disgruntled by it.

(For those who don’t know me, I have a great caseload size, I’m not teacher certified, and I’m not unhappy with ASHA…but I know lots of SLPs who are 1 if not all 4 of these).

Most SLPs would agree, CCSS appears to add a lot of nonsense work to our already busy schedules. It seems redundant to what we are already doing. A common thread of dissatisfaction comes from the fact that it pushes kids…and it does. For the exceptional kids who are already pushed, it feels almost insurmountable and as if we are doing a grave disservice to them.

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