Morals, Ethics, and Responsibilities

Have you ever considered, I mean REALLY considered the responsibility we have to ourselves, our clients, and our profession? Of course you have…

We know we have a responsibility to keep up to date on research, to use evidence based practices in our clinical therapies, and to attempt to track our ever-widening (and often over-reaching) scope of practice…This helps our maintain our responsibility to our clients and profession (sort of).

But what about our responsibility to our fellow clinicians? That one is a bit trickier, isn’t it? Where does OUR responsibility end and THEIR responsibility begin? Is there a distinct line?  Continue reading

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SLPs, Agnotology, and Responsibility

In recent months, the United States has experienced a bit of a shock (now, don’t run away, this isn’t that kind of a political post…I promise). Amidst that shock was the discussion about fake news sites and how frequent sharing of those fake news stories, perpetrated the untruths about various political candidates, etc. Special interest was taken by Facebook and other social media about their role in stopping those fake news sites. What no one seemed to mention is that these fake news stories have been around for a long time. I don’t know about anyone else, but I’ve used snopes.com to fact check many of those facebook stories that come around every few months for YEARS.

So…what does this have to do with speech-language pathology? Let me explain.
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Don’t bother reading the research!

Say what?

You heard me…Don’t bother reading the research!

Are you wondering why I would possibly say something like that? I mean, speech-language pathology IS a science based career, right? Anyone who has read me here or on Facebook/Twitter, knows that evidence based practice and research is something that I drone on (and on and on) about…so why on earth would I possibly say don’t bother?

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Finding the research!

“You are either part of the problem – or part of the solution…If you’re not an active part of the solution you are, by default, a part of the problem.” M.E.Huston. Yep. I’m quoting myself, how narcissistic is that? (Guess what, I didn’t really quote myself. Apparently I misquoted Eldridge Cleaver.)  However, in this case, it absolutely applies. Let me explain.

A few weeks ago, I published a post about pseudoscience and the unfortunate (but true) trend we seem to be experiencing within speech-language pathology of sliding down pseudoscience’s slippery slope.

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Have we turned into pseudoscientists?

This will not be a popular post.  I suspect it will anger a few, for that I’m sorry…A few will write to congratulate me…and a few will simply unfollow me. Regardless, I feel it has to be said. I hope that patience will be in abundance today.

It’s no secret that I love social media. I’ve been active with the #SLPeeps community on twitter since before the hashtag was created (that’s pre-2010 for those who don’t know). I’ve written about using social media to increase professional networking in the ASHA Leader Live several times. But, I’ll have to admit, I have a love-hate relationship with Facebook. I’ve been on several FB SLP groups (and left, and returned, and left, and returned). Today, I was resoundingly reminded of why and rather than leave the group, I’ve decided to vent here.  Continue reading

Reflections on Learning

Also known as … wait? It’s MY fault he’s not learning?

I recently attended a webinar by Presence Learning that was part of their Agents of Change series. Before I go any further, I’d like to suggest that each one of you (if you’re an SLP or Teacher) go to their website and sign up for the newsletters so that you also receive notifications of their free CEUs. The information presented is typically very useful AND they’re repeating the series called Greatest Hits Summer Series (Grandin, Prizant, Robertson, Burns, and more).

Okay…Now that that’s done (You DID do it, right?)… here are my thoughts about one I attended recently. Continue reading

How does your articulation assessment measure up?

It’s hard to believe it’s March…and time for Research Tuesday (again!). I remember being in grad school (or maybe undergrad) and doing a group project on articulation assessments. We were split into groups (or we split ourselves into groups, I don’t remember), and we were required to study an assigned articulation assessment, determine validity, specificity, etc… and critique the administration, picture stimuli, results, etc. It was an interesting assignment. I remember making the power point for it, and I remember talking with the Dean of the department and telling him I wanted to update the test we had (it was horribly out of date), and he said that’d be a great thesis or dissertation project. LOL. Too bad, I can’t remember the name of the test now (I could go look it up, but it’d take too much energy.)

Anyway…When I came upon today’s article, it reminded me of that assignment…and I thought it was important to review. So, without further adieu I bring you Research Tuesday! Continue reading